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friendlyangryfeminist:

i want bisexual representation - but i don’t want bisexual representation where every woman has a HOT STEAMY AFFAIR with anther woman and saves her romantic true love arcs for a man.

and more than that I want the patriarchal demand that all women must prioritize their relationships with any and all men over relationships with other women. and that’s a larger problem than representation,

(Source: fauxcyborg)

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I’m not “offended” by the shit people say—I am harmed by it. When you complain about having to be “PC,” you are saying that you are perfectly fine with hurting people and supporting cultural systems that cause tangible harm to certain populations.

(Source: mater-tenebrarum, via reverseracism)

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killgringos:

ursulatheseabitchh:

meguinpenguin:

ursulatheseabitchh:

So I made this thing and I’m pretty proud of it, haha.

I think this was really well done, but now I want to see this broken down to see when each of the films was created. 

Something I think a lot of people don’t take into consideration is the fact that a fair amount of these movies were made during times when it was very much the norm to have only white characters. And not to mention the fact that Disney is based in a country with an extremely Euro-centric culture. 

I’m gonna direct you to the first slide of the 3 that are below the photoset because there’s an entire paragraph on that.

Yes good

(via basilcake)

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negrescence:

Surveillance Video Catches Police Informant Planting Crack On Black Business Owner

The Black male owner of a head-shop selling so-called “tobacco” products in Scotia, New York seems to have been the victim of a police informant’s set-up. Surveillance video from Dapp City Smoke Shop shows an unnamed white man in a leather jacket pull what appears to be crack cocaine out of his pocket and place it on the counter. The paid, confidential informant for the Schenectady County Sheriff’s Office then photographs the drugs as “evidence.” 

Head-shop owner Donald Andrews was charged with felonies — criminal sale and criminal possession of a controlled substance — that could have put him behind bars for 25 years. Forced to close his store, Andrews had spent three weeks in county jail before his lawyer insisted the grand jury view the surveillance footage.  On April 25, after authorities saw the tape, charges were dropped.

This week, the community gathered at a Christian Leadership Conference and expressed their concern with policing tactics, particularly incentivizing bogus busts by using paid informants. Many of them, facing their own charges, have a lot at stake in procuring convictions, however unethically. Community members also expressed concern that the set-up was racially motivated. 

 ”With an informant like this, he will lie and plant things and he can’t really be trusted,”  Robert Outlar, told NEWS10 at the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.  Many of Andrews’ supporters are concerned the same paid informant has acted afoul before, prompting calls for District Attorney Robert Carney to review past cases with which he was involved. The Schenectady County Sherriff Dominic Dagostino however, told NEWS10 he does not believe there are other problems related to the informant. How he could be so sure, given the circumstances, is not clear. 

"We believe that police used this same person on other matters, including those involving residents who may have pleaded guilty out of fear of lengthier incarceration or after having concluded that no one would believe they were framed if they denied the accusations," Outlar also said. 

Dagostino’s officers are currently on the look-out for the unknown informant, who skipped town and is facing perjury and possession charges. According to NEWS10, he participated in seven other cases, two of which led to convictions. Andrews’ case is not the first time a paid informant has been linked to shady behavior, but is simply the latest installment in examples of what can go wrong when cold hard cash is linked to a conviction. 

(Source: rs620, via reverseracism)

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priceofliberty:

A new children’s show called “Burka Avenger” premieres in Pakistan next month. It features a female superhero in a fictional northern Pakistani town, and two regular villains meant to reflect the reality in Pakistan; a corrupt government official and an evil magician styled to look and feel like a Taliban commander. The show was created by Pakistani pop star Haroon Rashid.
From AP:

Our protagonist is a mild-mannered teacher with secret martial arts skills who uses a flowing black burka to hide her identity as she fights local thugs seeking to shut down the girls’ school where she works.
Sadly, it’s a battle Pakistanis are all too familiar with in the real world.
The Taliban have blown up hundreds of schools and attacked activists in Pakistan’s northwest because they oppose girls’ education. The militants sparked worldwide condemnation last fall when they shot 15-year-old schoolgirl activist Malala Yousafzai in the head in an unsuccessful attempt to kill her.
Action in the “Burka Avenger” cartoon series, which is scheduled to start running on Geo TV in early August, is much more lighthearted. The bungling bad guys evoke more laughter than fear and are no match for the Burka Avenger, undoubtedly the first South Asian ninja who wields books and pens as weapons.

priceofliberty:

A new children’s show called “Burka Avenger” premieres in Pakistan next month. It features a female superhero in a fictional northern Pakistani town, and two regular villains meant to reflect the reality in Pakistan; a corrupt government official and an evil magician styled to look and feel like a Taliban commander. The show was created by Pakistani pop star Haroon Rashid.

From AP:

Our protagonist is a mild-mannered teacher with secret martial arts skills who uses a flowing black burka to hide her identity as she fights local thugs seeking to shut down the girls’ school where she works.

Sadly, it’s a battle Pakistanis are all too familiar with in the real world.

The Taliban have blown up hundreds of schools and attacked activists in Pakistan’s northwest because they oppose girls’ education. The militants sparked worldwide condemnation last fall when they shot 15-year-old schoolgirl activist Malala Yousafzai in the head in an unsuccessful attempt to kill her.

Action in the “Burka Avenger” cartoon series, which is scheduled to start running on Geo TV in early August, is much more lighthearted. The bungling bad guys evoke more laughter than fear and are no match for the Burka Avenger, undoubtedly the first South Asian ninja who wields books and pens as weapons.

(via reverseracism)

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reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

landofdoom:

allthingshyper:

ionosphere-negate:

le-claire-de-lune:

crowdog66:

smellslikegirlriot:

If you are reading this, thank this woman. Her name is Grace Hopper, and she is one of the most under appreciated computer scientists ever. You think Gates and Jobs were cool? THIS WOMAN WORKED ON COMPUTERS WHEN THEY TOOK UP ROOMS. She invented the first compiler, which is a program that translates a computer language like Java or C++ into machine code, called assembly, that can be read by a processor. Every single program you use, every OS and server, was made possible by her first compiler.

Spread the word! (Although I’ll bet there are still some dudebros out there who’ll claim she’s a “fake geek”…)

Favorite fact: She coined the term “debugging” when they had to remove an moth (an actual, living moth) that had gotten trapped in the Mark II computer at Harvard University in 1947. While referring to glitches as bugs existed before, she brought the term into popularity. 

She also got the trend of personal computers going with her suggestion to the DoD to use more smaller units rather than one big one.

Please explain to me why I never knew about her before?

Rear Admiral (lower half) Grace Hopper. A serviceman would get his rank included, no matter how brief the history lesson. A servicewoman deserves the same respect.

Y’all should watch this interview with her. It’s from David Letterman’s NBC show. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-vcErOPofQ

reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

landofdoom:

allthingshyper:

ionosphere-negate:

le-claire-de-lune:

crowdog66:

smellslikegirlriot:

If you are reading this, thank this woman. Her name is Grace Hopper, and she is one of the most under appreciated computer scientists ever. You think Gates and Jobs were cool? THIS WOMAN WORKED ON COMPUTERS WHEN THEY TOOK UP ROOMS. She invented the first compiler, which is a program that translates a computer language like Java or C++ into machine code, called assembly, that can be read by a processor. Every single program you use, every OS and server, was made possible by her first compiler.

Spread the word! (Although I’ll bet there are still some dudebros out there who’ll claim she’s a “fake geek”…)

Favorite fact: She coined the term “debugging” when they had to remove an moth (an actual, living moth) that had gotten trapped in the Mark II computer at Harvard University in 1947. While referring to glitches as bugs existed before, she brought the term into popularity. 

She also got the trend of personal computers going with her suggestion to the DoD to use more smaller units rather than one big one.

Please explain to me why I never knew about her before?

Rear Admiral (lower half) Grace Hopper. A serviceman would get his rank included, no matter how brief the history lesson. A servicewoman deserves the same respect.

Y’all should watch this interview with her. It’s from David Letterman’s NBC show. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-vcErOPofQ

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

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sociolab:

squashed:

barticles:

Great question.

Other great questions:

If drunk driving is really so dangerous why do we need a law to stop people from doing it?


If the dollar menu really only costs a dollar, why are they spending so much money trying to get me to believe that?


If evacuating before a hurricane is such a great idea, why are the police forcing people to do it?

Or maybe those are dumb questions. Maybe people don’t always act in a rationally self-interested manner. Or maybe people need a bit of impetus to protect themselves sometimes.
The Medicaid expansion (at least in the states that don’t like shooting themselves in the foot) is pretty obviously a good deal for anybody eligible. Free healthcare. But there are going to be millions of people who aren’t going to enroll because they don’t get around to it, they don’t know they can, or they don’t know how to do it. Maybe the mandate will help. Maybe the mandate won’t do anything. This has nothing to do with whether or not it’s a good idea and everything to do with how actual people make actual decisions.

The mandate is necessary because it requires everyone to buy into the system, regardless of health.  Otherwise, the system would fail because it would have to carry the burden of providing care only to sick people.  Having healthy people in the system is a way to subsidize the costs and keep them low..relatively speaking.
Any attempt at a national health care system mandates everyone “buy in”.  There are some exceptions here and there, but this can only work if it includes everyone.

sociolab:

squashed:

barticles:

Great question.

Other great questions:

  • If drunk driving is really so dangerous why do we need a law to stop people from doing it?

  • If the dollar menu really only costs a dollar, why are they spending so much money trying to get me to believe that?

  • If evacuating before a hurricane is such a great idea, why are the police forcing people to do it?

Or maybe those are dumb questions. Maybe people don’t always act in a rationally self-interested manner. Or maybe people need a bit of impetus to protect themselves sometimes.

The Medicaid expansion (at least in the states that don’t like shooting themselves in the foot) is pretty obviously a good deal for anybody eligible. Free healthcare. But there are going to be millions of people who aren’t going to enroll because they don’t get around to it, they don’t know they can, or they don’t know how to do it. Maybe the mandate will help. Maybe the mandate won’t do anything. This has nothing to do with whether or not it’s a good idea and everything to do with how actual people make actual decisions.

The mandate is necessary because it requires everyone to buy into the system, regardless of health.  Otherwise, the system would fail because it would have to carry the burden of providing care only to sick people.  Having healthy people in the system is a way to subsidize the costs and keep them low..relatively speaking.

Any attempt at a national health care system mandates everyone “buy in”.  There are some exceptions here and there, but this can only work if it includes everyone.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)